The Wind – Friday Fictioneers

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by the wonderful Rochelle, the undisputed master of what I call Sound Bite Fiction.
She sets the weekly challenge, and the standard.
This week’s prompt is a stunning masterpiece of the photographic art.
By me.
It shows a beach front property in Medville, where I live.
The idea, as always, is to write a story of around 100 words based on the picture, below.

chateau-de-sable-ceayr

Copyright C. E. Ayr

The Wind

The Mistral hammered my town yesterday.
Amazingly, the little café in the square escaped any damage.
My friend Rafa, the proprietor, is so relieved.
A nearby business, a rival of my own small company, was devastated.
The entire building collapsed as though it were made of sand.
There was also a real tragedy.
A man was killed when a branch crashed through his windscreen just outside my house.
I know his wife.
Quite well.
Apparently he had a baseball bat in the passenger seat.
Life can be difficult and even dangerous at times.
It is good to control the wind.

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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72 Responses to The Wind – Friday Fictioneers

  1. Indira says:

    You stories uncover very slowly for me. Like a painting, cover here expose there. unique effect. Takes time but could understand. Enjoyed.

    Like

  2. What a scary story, told in your inimitable, laconic style! I would NOT like to cross paths with the man who can control the wind. (I was reminded of Aeolus, who controlled the winds, and provided the West Wing to Odysseus to help him reach Ithaca, except he was much more benign!)

    Like

  3. Margaret says:

    That’s a man I wouldn’t like to cross. I hope the new widow he’knows quite well’ knows what she’s doing. This is a fantastic story – the last line blew me away.

    Like

  4. CE, your stories always deliver… what they deliver varies, but never disappoints! This one is indeed a strange and cryptic tale, that made both Dawns laugh. 😉

    Like

  5. Amy Reese says:

    What a tragic story, CE. Such is the power of Mother Nature. Thanks for the lovely photo.

    Like

  6. rgayer55 says:

    This guy’s got it all going for him. We could certainly use him over at the Playboy Mansion we just bought from Honest John. Telling him he’s got a standing invite–any time.

    Like

  7. ‘I knew his wife’. I smell a euphemism.

    Thanks for the pic.

    Like

  8. draliman says:

    Very nice! I like how realisation gradually dawns on the reader towards the end. Not a man to cross!

    Like

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  10. subroto says:

    Looks like all the rivals suffer from the wind (and we all know how troublesome that can be). Delightfully wicked tale.

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      Well done, you are the first (excluding myself) to lower the tone of things.
      No mean feat here, I assure you.
      Delightfully wicked is a double hurrah for me, thank you.

      Like

  11. Dale says:

    How so very convenient… All in one swoop! Bat or wind… 😉

    Like

  12. He controlled the wind and got rid of his competition. I guess the bat was meant for him but he was able to have the wind blow the branch through the wind shield before the jealous husband confronted him?

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  13. Your stories of murder often make me feel guilty, because I laugh.

    Like

  14. Gone with the wind. Who next I wonder.
    Thanks for the picture. It transported me back to the years when I lived in France

    Visit Keith’s Ramblings!

    Like

  15. Great photo to work from this week C.E. and your story is scary. Sounds like your narrator just missed having his own windscreen beaten in. Thank God for the wind.

    Like

  16. ansumani says:

    I have been a fan of your stories and storytelling from day one…I am your friend…Please remember that when you unleash the ‘wind’ again 🙂

    Great take on the prompt and very creative.

    Like

  17. elmowrites says:

    Very clever stuff. Fasten down the hatches, there’s a storm coming!

    Like

  18. There’s one man it doesn’t pay to anger or threaten. It must be handy to be able to control the wind. Creepy, though. O_o Well done, C.E. Thanks again for the lovely picture that’s inspiring so many good stories. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      Thank you, Suzanne, glad you like the story and the photo.
      But remember that it is Rochelle who selects the prompt from the millions of pics she gets sent.

      Like

  19. lillian says:

    “There was also a real tragedy.” I understand the hint of the affair….well, more than a hint. The idea of the baseball bat on the car seat and we wonder if it’s meant for….? But this sentence…a “real tragedy” says a lot. The loss of a building in comparison to the loss of a life. It tells me the speaker in the poem, regardless of the affair, has a good heart and recognizes the value of life.
    Well done.
    And thanks for the photo for this week’s prompt! I had fun with it 🙂

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      Thank you, Lillian, for your thoughtful comments.
      I am not sure that I, oops, I mean the narrator, deserves your kind interpretation.
      But I am happy you enjoyed the story and the pic.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. d3athlily says:

    Wow. It probably does come in handy knowing how to control the wind, but not so much for jealous husbands or business owners. Hehe

    Like

  21. Vinay Leo R. says:

    I wonder what will be the next building targeted by the wind.

    Like

  22. That’s a chills down the spine job!

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  23. Martin Flux says:

    I can smell an affair. And some not entirely fair business dealing. The narrator doesn’t seem to be too bothered though. I really enjoyed this story.

    PS: Sorry for burning down your Medville property in my story. Collateral damage.

    Like

  24. luckyjc007 says:

    Nicely done. Reading this brings to mind…killing two birds with one stone (maybe even wind) ! I see two problems out of his way now. 🙂

    Like

  25. plaridel says:

    paging inspector couseau… the baseball bat should be checked for blood. the branch crash could have been staged to camouflage a murder.

    Like

  26. mjlstories says:

    My favourite line – Quite well.
    That’s quite a talent – the protagonist of the story and his creator.

    Like

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  28. paulmclem says:

    Perhaps he was on his way to play baseball? I hope Mr Wind took that into consideration…lol.

    Like

  29. gahlearner says:

    A scary man, I fear for everyone who disagrees with him. Someone who can control the wind, even if it’s perhaps only in his imagination, may want to control other things, too. Poor woman… Excellent story.

    Like

  30. Oh, quite chilling this.

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  31. Oh, he is not a very nice man.

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  32. Ouch… the blunt object can be so many things beside a branch… Both business and wife at the same time… I think he should thank the Mistral.

    Like

  33. Sandra says:

    If you’re taking out a love rival bent on revenge, what better collateral damage than taking out a business rival too? And preserving your local watering hole. I love a practical man who can capitalise on events. Well done.

    Like

  34. Dear CE,

    Quite well? Your narrator is a frightening and your story sent a chilling breeze down my spine. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

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