Windows – Friday Fictioneers

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by the wonderful Rochelle, the undisputed master of what I call Sound Bite Fiction.
She sets the weekly challenge, and the standard.
And the prompt
photo, which this week is very American.
The idea, as always, is to write a story of around 100 words based on this picture, below.

© J Hardy Carroll


Click here to hear the writer read his words:

Windows

Windows are just glass.
In reality, they have no inside, and no outside.
If we turn them the other way they are exactly the same.
And yet looking out of a window is a totally different experience from looking in through one.
In the first instance, generally speaking, we see a world populated by many others, perhaps known, perhaps not.
In the second case, all too often, we are intruding, perhaps uninvited, into the privacy of a person, a couple, a family.
At night, on the outside, we can be almost invisible.
Why do we relish this so much more?

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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57 Responses to Windows – Friday Fictioneers

  1. Love the introspection here without the feel of darkness.

    Like

  2. Dale says:

    Excellent reflection, c.e. I did not feel the menace at all in this well-written piece.

    Like

  3. kzmcb says:

    I quite agree. You’ve made some good points about the similarities and differences between inside and outside, gently moving the reader with you as you look. Loved it, and your recital of it as well.

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      Thank you, Karen (no more Sheila, okay!) for your kind words.
      I am glad you enjoyed the reading too.
      I am not always sure it is worthwhile, but you made it so this week.

      Like

  4. plaridel says:

    why does it remind me of a besieged castle? those who are in wants to get out and those who are out wants to get in. 🙂

    Like

  5. James McEwan says:

    Interesting, that some people are trapped inside glass bubbles.

    Like

  6. Tessa says:

    Definitely, something to think about.

    Like

  7. msjadeli says:

    I think any gossip magazine is the equivalent of looking in someone’s window. It’s ironic that celebrities love to be on the big screen, with all eyes on them, but off-screen would be prefer to be left alone. What they don’t want to realize is with celebrities it is open season on snooping. It’s the price they have to pay. For the rest of us non-celebrities we are entitled to whatever privacy we choose, with few exceptions.

    Like

  8. Very thought-provoking piece.

    Like

  9. I love the way you have described the different ways you can view a window… reminds me a little bit of Jung, and the way you cannot really see the inside of anyone…. we do have our own windows don’t we?

    Like

  10. Loved it, thought provoking stuff and you absolutely nailed it!

    Like

  11. I really enjoyed your description of the window, very philosophical. It’s true, we are all drawn to watching through the window; inside to outside, outside to inside. Anonymity is appealing.

    Like

  12. draliman says:

    Nice observation of the human condition. Remind me to get some of that reflective sticky stuff…

    Like

  13. Hey mankind is so cursed to be an incurable voyeur

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  14. I’ll never see in or out of a window in the same way again!

    Like

  15. Laurie Bell says:

    Oooo I really like this. What you’ve done here is very clever. Makes one think

    Like

  16. Abhijit Ray says:

    Looking into someone else life from a distance unnoticed has its fun. We enjoy the drama without getting affected. Kind of like a silent movie. Till we get caught.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. DB McNicol says:

    At night, some of us black out the windows in an attempt to maintain our privacy while others leave their open for viewing.

    I definitely enjoyed “your” view into windows.

    Like

  18. Iain Kelly says:

    I’m sure I’ve bumped in to him while out ‘walking’ late at night…

    Like

  19. AH! An unexpected and fabulous viewing angle (pun and all …) 😉
    Nice!

    Like

  20. Dear CE,

    A peeping Tom perhaps? Nice take.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      That was not my intention, m’lady, but seems to have been interpreted that way by several readers.
      I meant the story to be somewhat more philosophical and seem to have missed the mark.

      Like

  21. granonine says:

    A voyeur lives to observe, but not to BE observed. Some weird kink in all the little convolutions of the brain 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  22. pennygadd51 says:

    I certainly relished your story! That last line is such a witty conclusion to your description.

    Like

  23. Creepy. I think most of us hate the idea of someone going around peeking in windows. A good story, C.E. I’m sometimes glad I live a few stories up. Now if we only had a lift. —-Suzanne

    Like

  24. Varad says:

    The subtlety of the character description is sublime. Very well done, CE.

    Like

  25. Sandra says:

    Acutely observed, beautifully executed. The menace is wonderfully understated. Well done. Says so much in so few words. (As a mundane aside, I have to dispute the bit about them having no inside and outside. Our double glazing contractor has managed to lay two conservatory ceiling panels the wrong way up – and after almost 12 months we’re still waiting for the second one to be replaced.) I’m thinking of contracting Portuguese Tony to deal with them.

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      Thank you, Sandra. Praise from Caesar…
      And I laughed aloud at your ‘mundane aside’.
      I am no expert on double glazing, but I am probably less of a threat to your home and happiness than Tony Casquette!

      Liked by 2 people

  26. Let’s hope he doesn’t graduate from windows to doors

    Liked by 1 person

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