Colour Blind – Friday Fictioneers

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by the wonderful Rochelle, the undisputed master of what I call Sound Bite Fiction.
She sets the weekly challenge, and the standard.
And the prompt photo, which this week is
provided courtesy of Dale Rogerson.
The idea, as always, is to write a story of around 100 words based on this picture, below.

© Dale Rogerson

Click here to hear the writer read his words:

Colour Blind

Susie is intelligent, funny, and achingly beautiful.
Our wedding is planned for September.
I am beyond happiness.
In the street we meet a cousin I haven’t seen for a while.
She introduces her fiancé.
Later I say to Susie ‘Tom is great, yeah, smart, serious, and he obviously adores Mary’.
She shrugs ‘Hmm, I guess’.
I am surprised.
‘Did I miss something?’
‘You know’, she says.
I look blankly at her.
‘Don’t tell me it doesn’t matter’, she says.
Now I am praying she doesn’t mean what I think.
But she does.
And the lights in my life go out.

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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51 Responses to Colour Blind – Friday Fictioneers

  1. I didn’t catch the meaning of your story at first either. I should have in today’s climate. It’s getting worse instead of better. Really well done, C.E. —- Suzanne

    Like

  2. I love what you’ve done here. And the title is so important because initially I didn’t read it. I read the story twice and then looked and had a “duh” moment. This is wonderful, C.E. I don’t know that it’s the same in France or the UK, but here in the States, people’s true selves are being shown and it’s not a pretty sight. Your story shows why.

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    • ceayr says:

      Thank you, Sascha, for your kind words. I am sad to say the problem of prejudice, or bigotry, seems to be universal. Sometimes it is for pseudo-religious reasons as in Ireland and, to my great shame, Scotland, with the Catholic/Protestant divide, or it is antisemitism, anti-Muslim or anti-anything that is different. And sometimes it is just a question of skin colour. And we are all to blame, to varying degrees.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I read this twice hoping the narrator had realized something different but alas. Your stories are always wonderfully told

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  4. I love your stories, powerful subjects yet gently written and food for thought. Though it’s incredibly sad to find out your significant other has a prejudice that cannot be overlooked or lived with, it’s best he found out before they were married.

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  5. Very sad. And so much unsaid. beautifully delivered as usual.

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  6. I don’t think I’ve ever read a story so many times – I should have taken more notice of the title from the outset! Nice one CE

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  7. James McEwan says:

    I like how this makes you think about what we like and dislike. When does it it beome a prejudice: in our thoughts or by our actions.

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  8. It took a little time to get it (Thanks to the comments).

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  9. The title was a great clue. Some people have a hard time accepting mixed-race relationships. At least the MC found out about Susie’s narrow views before he married her.

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  10. draliman says:

    Ah, thanks to pennygad’s comment and re-reading the title I think I understand what’s going on here. I reckon the wedding’s off.

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    • ceayr says:

      Yes, it appears I was rather too vague this week, the clues not doing their job!
      I have always been very aware of the ‘crime’ of being different, and I try to ridicule these prejudices whenever possible.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Abhijit Ray says:

    So Tom adores Susie too and Susie appreciates the gesture? Any you are still marrying her in September?

    Like

  12. Nobbinmaug says:

    To quote your narrator, did I miss something? I don’t understand what happened? Did she have a previous relationship with Tom? Or did she kill him? Is Tom a robot from the future? Is somebody a robot from the future? May I be a robot from the future?

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    • ceayr says:

      All great ideas, but sadly not what I had in mind!
      The much more insidious human problem, as hinted at in the title, of bigotry based on ethnic background.
      And yes, you write fiction, so you can be anything you want!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Mike says:

    Relationships, are, well they are, nicely told.

    Like

  14. Iain Kelly says:

    It was all going so well until then… Some things are just too good to be true I guess.

    Like

  15. pennygadd51 says:

    Oh, no! What an upset!
    I love the clever way you’ve told this story, leaning on the title to ensure that the reader understands what you’re saying.

    Like

  16. What a thought provoking story. Deft writing!

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

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  17. She’s a deceptive one! 😉

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  18. Dear CE,

    That last line cuts to the quick. Things aren’t always what they seem, are they?

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  19. Sandra says:

    Never hurts to do a little background check… before you get in too deep, I mean.

    Like

  20. neilmacdon says:

    A poignant tale. Perhaps the narrator should have been a bit more curious about Susie’s past.

    Like

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