Glenfiddich – Friday Fictioneers

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by the wonderful Rochelle, the undisputed master of what I call Sound Bite Fiction.
She sets the weekly challenge, the standard, and the prompt photo.
The idea, as always, is to write a story of around 100 words based on this picture, below, which this week is supplied by
Fatima Fakier Deria.

© Fatima Fakier Deria

Click here to hear the writer read his words:

Glenfiddich

I watch him, silently.
He sits staring out of the window.
His creased brow is reflected in the grimy glass.
His thoughts are troubled.
He knows he cannot win, but he refuses to go without a fight.
Someone will pay.
Under his right hand is a pistol, loaded and ready.
Near his left hand is a glass, containing neat Glenfiddich.
A great whisky, a fatal mistake.
When he turns his head to reach for it, I move.
Quickly and quietly I am behind him.
My knife slips across his throat.
The glass falls.
To my disappointment the bottle is empty.

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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46 Responses to Glenfiddich – Friday Fictioneers

  1. This is more than a story…this is a book!

    Like

  2. Did the whiskey make him do it?

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    • ceayr says:

      No, dear lady, the whisky – please note the spelling, no ‘e’ – is irrelevant to the killing

      Liked by 1 person

      • I jest CE. Please note a sense of humour. Thank you for correcting the typo.

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        • ceayr says:

          My apologies, GiN, but humour in text is not always obvious.
          I will remember yours for future reference.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Thank you CE.
            In regard to spelling – in my research on the World Wide Web I discovered a great debate on the spelling of the word Whiskey and Whisky. Here’s what I found, “The Scots spell it whisky and the Irish spell it whiskey, with an extra ‘e’. This difference in the spelling comes from the translations of the word from the Scottish and Irish Gaelic forms. Whiskey with the extra ‘e’ is also used when referring to American whiskies.”
            Isn’t that interesting? I use the extra e, because any extra whiskey is always better. Thanks again!

            Like

            • ceayr says:

              I appreciate your interest, GiN, and already pointed out to a gentleman below: There is no ‘e’ in Scotch, only in Irish and American imitations.
              As my story features Glenfiddich, there is clearly no ‘e’.
              Incidentally, as a Scot, I find the additional ‘e’ rather irritating, but I empathise with your view that more is better.

              Liked by 1 person

  3. Lynn Love says:

    He needs to renegotiate his rates – perhaps a case or two should be part of the next contract? Seems a shame for the victim he didn’t get to finish his dram though. Wonderfully, cheekily written, as always, C. Hope you’re well

    Like

  4. Clearly feels no remorse for the murder.

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  5. draliman says:

    Aw, shucks. All that trouble and murdering and whatnot and the bottle’s empty 🙂

    Like

  6. What a waste of good whiskey… but it could have been worse… it could have been Lagavulin

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  7. James McEwan says:

    A death, a murder or a revenge for drinking all the liquid gold. I feel the focus and greatest loss here is not of a man’s life, but for the whisky.

    Like

  8. Abhijit Ray says:

    Did he kill him for the whisky or whisky was an after thought?

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  9. That’s so disappointing. Try next door, I hear he drinks Glengoyne.

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  10. I don’t get whiskey, I do however get the story, well written stuff as ever!

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  11. Iain Kelly says:

    A wee dram would’ve been just the thing to calm the adrenaline too.

    Like

  12. Nobbinmaug says:

    Check the cabinet on your way out.

    Excellent job of building the tension.

    Like

  13. Loved the way you built a chilling atmosphere and then surprised me with the light ending.

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Like

  14. granonine says:

    Oh, shiver and shudder! Great piece for a spooky Halloween Eve 🙂

    Like

  15. oy! That’s some troublesome scotch, that is!

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  16. neilmacdon says:

    I’m more an Islay malt man myself. I wouldn’t kill for a Glenfiddich. But I understand tastes vary and he had his reasons. Well written as always, mate

    Like

  17. Tannille says:

    Well I hope that glass was empty… the horror…
    Great read.

    Like

  18. Dear CE,

    Glenfiddich is fluently spoken here. At least by my husband. A lot of trouble for a glass of Scotch.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

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