The Bomb – Friday Fictioneers

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by the wonderful Rochelle, the undisputed master of what I call Sound Bite Fiction.
She sets the weekly challenge, and the standard.
This somewhat cryptic photo by Connie Gayer, surely a saint, has my mind wandering, and wondering.
The idea, as always, is to write a story of around 100 words based on the picture, below.

© Connie Gayer

© Connie Gayer

The Bomb

The explosion is devastating.
It is market day in the old town, and the narrow streets are packed.
It is also a school holiday, so many of the women have their children with them.
Shrapnel flies everywhere, killing and maiming.
People are screaming in pain and terror.
Some are trying to flee, some are trying to get closer to help.
Many, of course, are not moving.
Cars are ablaze, shop windows are shattered.
Blood and limbs are splattered everywhere.
Panic and mayhem ensue.
I gaze down on the carnage.
And smile.
It is true what they say.
Suicide is painless.

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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83 Responses to The Bomb – Friday Fictioneers

  1. Margaret says:

    I’m very late in commenting, but just today I’ve heard on the radio of terrorist attacks in Paris, so I was already shaking my head and wondering when and how it will all end. A very powerful story, CE.

    Like

  2. Indira says:

    I agree what Suzanne Joshi has written. Well written. Very realistic.

    Like

  3. #%^@!
    (Because i know you don’t like it when I use foul language). 🙂

    Like

  4. Most of this is extremely realistic, Ceayr. It could be a recent piece in the newspaper. The tragidy is that the suicide bombers are told it is for God, and they’ll go striaight to their version of heaven. They’ve been so brainwashed they don’t consider the harm and killing of others as wrong. I see this as continuing as long as these ideals are taught to the poor and poverty continues. You can tell they prefer death to the life they lead. Here in this city in India, I don’t go to crowded places any more, but tell those who do go to be careful and avoid the most crowded, if possible. It’s terrible to have to live that way, but that’s also reality. Well written. —- Suzanne Joshi

    Liked by 1 person

  5. subroto says:

    “suicide is painless” ah the lines from one of my favorite songs but this is a very different setting indeed. You have indeed covered the horror of the carnage left behind. The final end of a demented mind cos there is no afterlife.

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      Thanks for your visit and your contribution, Subroto.
      I know that many of my readers disagree with your views on an afterlife.
      Fortunately this blog is not a forum for such a discussion.
      Cheers

      Like

  6. Sarah Ann says:

    C – Very graphic descriptions, making this an uncomfortable and difficult read.
    I had to re-read a few times to realise the bomber was dead and looking down from heaven – probably just me being slow, but I initially saw him/ her looking down from a building and wondered how a suicide could be seeing and describing. A
    A difficult subject well handled.

    Like

  7. Large groups of unemployed youths + a need to belong and have some kind of identity (e.g. join a glorified gang) + ideology — does this threesome of circumstances ring a bell right across history. I’m thinking of what happened in Germany and why so many young man were willing to take up arms in a seeming act of madness.
    A thought-provoking piece, ceayr.

    Like

  8. Amy Reese says:

    What a tragic scene, CE. Great piece!

    Like

  9. unique view of a tragedy. Glad he is dead, anyway!

    Like

  10. Jan Brown says:

    A powerful story, CE. Well done.

    Like

  11. gahlearner says:

    This is a painful read because of the content and timeliness. I agree with Tracey about how you perfectly describe the detachment with that afterlife twist.

    Like

  12. Alice Audrey says:

    That is the wrong way to blow your top. Just saying.

    At the same time I’m reading this, a youtube playlist tossed up a song about a guy who does a suicide bombing as part of his religion.

    Like

  13. mjlstories says:

    Not a comfortable read, and as you say not a comfortable write. Which is what makes it all the more powerful. Good piece. Think we get immune to casual violence in films etc.

    Like

  14. jellico84 says:

    That’s a good write. Very graphic and all too real for too many.

    Like

  15. draliman says:

    Very powerfully written. You really bring home this horrific scene.

    Like

  16. Pertinent. I thought “Many, of course, are not moving” is really great show not tell stuff.
    The world certainly isn’t a better p[lace for all these idiots seeking martyrdom. Great read.

    Like

  17. EagleAye says:

    My god, what a vision you paint. The scene you describe is powerful. It seems many have seen such things in this time of suicide bombers. Well done!

    Like

  18. plaridel says:

    top notch, gripping portrayal of a suicide bombing scene. after saying that, i still wonder why the bomber(s) would involve innocent civilians.

    Like

  19. If I believed life ended with death I might agree that suicide was painless. A gripping and terrifying story that peers into the heart of darkness.

    Like

  20. Painted a graphic scene, now seen almost everyday in the news. But I think our suicide bomber will find that his lack of pain won’t last – judgement is not painless! Well done!

    Like

  21. rgayer55 says:

    That was a bang-up ending on this one, CE.

    Like

  22. What a powerful piece and the twist that the narrator was the suicide bomber. You managed to convey two points of view superbly. Just wish it wasn’t so true to life.

    Like

  23. Corina says:

    Another one to think about.

    Like

  24. Unfortunately, this is no comic scene from M*A*S*H.
    Randy

    Like

  25. “I gaze down on the carnage” ~ I wonder if he is actually “looking up” at the carnage, if there truly is a personal hell for people like this. Well done.

    Like

  26. Great poem! Very graphic use of words! Good take on the prompt! 🙂

    Like

  27. helenmidgley says:

    Very dark but very well written 🙂

    Like

  28. Powerful. It conveys the detachment of the bomber from the carnage so well.
    Tracey

    Like

  29. paulmclem says:

    Painless (to a degree) to the perpetrator, but certainly not the victims.

    Like

  30. ansumani says:

    A sad scene. Well described.

    Like

  31. Reblogged this on anelephantcant and commented:
    AnElephantCant always be energetic
    Sometimes he is lethargic and tired
    So he has a wee rest
    Bounces back to his best
    He is really something when he gets all fired and wired

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Oh my, that is one hard-hitting story.

    Like

  33. Dale says:

    You describe so well the carnage…. too well, even!
    Truly well done, Mr. Ayr!

    Like

  34. And I see the helicopters from Mash landing… Terrific line to end it all with… we seems to have seen similar things in the soil.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Graham Lawrence says:

    As usual your fiction ‘bites’ A pertinent reminder of happenings I often struggle to understand. Thank you.

    Like

  36. Dear C.E.

    You truly took my breath away with this one. I hope he finds that his seventy virgins have been defiled. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Sandra says:

    A graphic description of what must be a truly appalling occurrence. And a killer last couple of lines there. Good job.

    Like

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