Murder Children – Six Sentence Story

Copyright C. E. Ayr

This challenge is produced by GirlieOnTheEdge with the following simple rules:
Write 6 Sentences. No more. No less.
Use the current week’s prompt word – TERM

Click here to hear the author read his words:

 

Murder Children

Now I understand why people murder children, I say to my grandson.

We are lunching on chicken and bacon sandwiches, scones and soft drinks in Glasgow’s magnificent Riverside Museum, aka the Museum of Transport, situated at the confluence of the rivers Clyde and Kelvin, and home to an astonishing collection of trains and boats and planes, also bicycles, motor bikes and motor cars, carts, buses and trams, and any other contraption that can be used to carry people, animals or stuff from one place to another (including the world’s oldest bicycle, built by Gavin Dalzell in 1846, which is, somewhat bizarrely, made of wood).

Just outwith our line of sight but, unfortunately, on the edge of our hearing, we suffer the repeated beep-beep-beep-beep of a pedestrian crossing, followed by a conversation between a little girl, whose piercing voice carries clearly, and an adult who we guess is a Lollipop Lady, but whose words are almost inaudible.

We determine that the scene is played at the press of a button and, given that there are around 17,000 schoolchildren (mid-term, I guess) behaving pretty much as one might expect a vast number of savage Scottish schoolchildren to behave in a gigantic structure full of thingys that excite their fertile imaginations, said button has just been pressed for the 1,314th (great number for those who know Scottish history) time.

The aforementioned, and increasingly annoying given the younger participant’s chalk on blackboard voice, conversation goes Hello (mumble mumble) Yes, please (mumble mumble) Sorry (mumble mumble) Thank you (mumble mumble) Bye-ee, leading us to speculate on the ‘Sorry’ while waiting cross-fingered in hope for the screech of brakes and a loud thwump.

Now I understand why people murder children, I say to my grandson, a peace-loving young hooligan, who grins, nods, and hands me, in lieu of anything more lethal, the small plastic knife he has just used to spread strawberry jam on his scone.


*** An Apology:
The discerning visitor might have noticed that this week’s photo and story are both situated in Glasgow, Bonnie Scotland, where I have been for the past week, hence my lack of participation in last week’s SSS.
So, my apologies to the fine writers who grace this challenge; I will endeavour to do better.
But probably not this week.

This entry was posted in Sound Bite Fiction and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

29 Responses to Murder Children – Six Sentence Story

  1. Liz H says:

    Enjoying a visit to Glasgow by proxy. Thank you, have fun, be good, and relish those scones!

    Like

  2. I was in the Riverside Museum and on the Tall Ship Glenlee with my granddaughter just a few weeks ago! Quite an experience I have to say.

    Like

  3. You’ve departed from your usual micro-fiction. 🙂 Your story makes me thankful I have hearing aids that can be shut off to reduce the noise by 90%. Would love to visit this locale!

    Like

  4. As i always say, there are good reasons animals eat their own young, but if you can stick it out, grandchildren are your reward for not killing your own children (and if you refrain from killing others’ children, you get to stay out of the hoosegow to enjoy those grands).

    Like

  5. Frank Hubeny says:

    Nice descriptions throughout especially, “behaving pretty much as one might expect a vast number of savage Scottish schoolchildren to behave” and the ending with the plastic knife covered with strawberry jam.

    Like

  6. Chris Hall says:

    What a treat! I was expecting blood-spattered knives, not a strawberry jam slathered scone.

    Like

  7. clark says:

    fun Six

    Yeah, you got me to go look… but seriously, dude, Banncockburn* ?!
    You guys is seriously demented with your historical names and such,
    (signed) real estate broker who sells in communities with names like Quonochontaug and streets proudly identified as ‘Sodom Trail’

    *messing with ya, ’cause the side trip you prompted ate up fifteen minutes of the morning…worth it, ‘tho

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Reena Saxena says:

    “Peace loving young hooligan” indeed..

    Like

  9. jenne49 says:

    The master of misdirection strikes again.
    From the title I wasn’t expecting such a fascinating wander through one of the museums of my hometown, or an introduction to your grandson, who clearly understands you perfectly and is a happy co-conspirator, ‘peace-loving young hooligan’ that he is.
    And that piercingly accurate description of children let loose with noise-producing buttons – I wonder if there’s anyone who can’t see themselves there – actually either as the adult or the child! 😉
    Just delightful.

    Liked by 1 person

    • ceayr says:

      Cheers, Jenne, it is one of Scotland’s top museums, a previous winner of European Museum of the Year Award.
      And kids are weans, wherever they are!

      Like

  10. Re ‘to spread strawberry jam on his scone’. Before or after the cream? 🙂 Great 6.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Cassa Bassa says:

    Ha glad your grandson is cool calm and collected. 😄

    Like

  12. Lindsey says:

    I really appreciate these beautifully descriptive paragraphs which had me sitting on the riverside taking in the view and inside the museum with my own grandchildren. I also love the way you casually discuss the downfall of children whilst spreading strawberry jam on your scones.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave your Sound Bite here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.