Conflict – Friday Fictioneers

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by the wonderful Rochelle, the undisputed master of what I call Sound Bite Fiction.
She sets the weekly challenge, the standard, and the prompt photo.
The idea, as always, is to write a story of around 100 words based on the picture below, which this week is supplied by the inimitable Dawn Miller, one of my favourite Fictioneers.

© Dawn Miller


Click here to hear the author read his words:

Conflict

Horses sweep into the farmyard.
A sergeant calls for the occupants.
Andy and his grandfather come out of the barn.
The captain dismounts, salutes.
We know who you are, sir, he says, and we will need men like you during this war.
Old Alex raises his eyebrows, laughs aloud.
No, sir, I am here for your grandsons, I hear that they are men in your own mould.
Objections about age are brushed aside, and Andy is told to saddle a horse.
When asked about his twin, he points.
Far across the river soldiers in different uniforms are approaching grandma’s house.

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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66 Responses to Conflict – Friday Fictioneers

  1. You’ve done my image proud. Kudos.

    Like

  2. A wonderful twist at the end. And clear, descriptive writing. It’s an old story, but you wrote it new.

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  3. pennygadd51 says:

    How beautifully you pull off that twist, CE. Elegant writing!

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  4. davezart says:

    wonderful story, and what a great idea to read it. I had never thought of that.

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  5. plaridel says:

    sadly, most young folks have romantic illusions about war.

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  6. James McEwan says:

    yes, civil war is anything but. It is also an excuse to settle grievances with the neighbours and take advantage of the chaos. Who said War was pure.

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  7. susanmehr says:

    There are no winners in a war, yet war will always be a part of life. So sad and true. Well written. Your piece reminds me of the movie ‘The Patriot.’

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  8. A war setting brother against brother. The grandpa must be torn.

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  9. bearmkwa says:

    Sounds a bit like the American Civil War between the North (Union) and South (Confederate). The North opposed slavery, the South embraced it. Many families had sons on both sides that way to ensure that no matter who won, they would be victors. It was a bloody, savage, and desperate period in our history.

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      There have been too many such conflicts throughout the world over the centuries, but the US Civil War was in my mind.
      But don’t you think that, in this situation, no matter who won, they would be losers?

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Russell says:

    War is bad enough, but I suppose we always look for ways to make it worse. Great take on the prompt!

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    • ceayr says:

      Very true, Russell.
      As I point out in my annual Remembrance Day post, the biggest change in the last 100 years is that we now allow women the equal opportunity to die on the front line.
      Progress, hmm…

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Liz Young says:

    War takes all the best and kills them. Pwerful story.

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  12. draliman says:

    Oh boy, fighting on opposite sides. This isn’t going to end well for their family.

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  13. Violet Lentz says:

    Life on opposite sides of the fence. Sounds like this could segue into an epic….

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  14. Cleverly set up and a delight to read. Well done, sir.

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  15. Whoa! Great story. You said a LOT in few words.

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  16. Brilliant depth to your story! I think Alex’s laugh is sardonic. How terrible to know your grandsons will be on opposite lines of fire.

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  17. Nobbinmaug says:

    It’s sad to think how arbitrary allegiance is in any war. Regardless of how one feels about a war or war, in general, you have to hope “your side” wins. “Your side” is decided for you by where you are or where you were born. You’ve captured that in your microcosm with the twins being on the opposite sides of the river at just the wrong time.

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  18. Mike says:

    I enjoyed how you tackled the prompt.

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  19. Well written, CE. While I didn’t expect the ending, I have read stories, nonfiction, from the American Civil War about brothers fighting brothers. Sad world that this would ever come about.

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  20. Sad that circumstance of separate visiting at that exact time would lead to conflict between brothers. Conversations into the future, what ifs and so forth. A tale brilliantly told, how fragile time is

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  21. This was sad, fascinating and unexpected in equa measures!

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

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  22. That actually happened to my family, Sad, sad story.

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  23. granonine says:

    Beautifully set up. Happens in any country or place where one is free to choose which side to be on.

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  24. trentpmcd says:

    Brother vs. brother – I do have ancestors that fought on both sides of our “Civil” War, including brothers… Good story.

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  25. One can only hope they don’t come face to face.

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  26. Iain Kelly says:

    An literal family at war. A cruel twist, but then maybe the twins don’t like each other much, same as their grandparents.

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  27. Sandra says:

    This left me wondering about the dilema the old soldier father must feel, watching both sons fighting for different sides. There’s much to ponder about that conflict. Presumably he has a conviction himself which he has to balance with those of each of his sons. A minefield of deliberation to be engaged in. Well done.

    Like

  28. Dear CE,

    My mind is sent to the American Civil War…could be any “civil” war I suppose. (Talk about an oxymoron.) This makes me sad for the twins and Alex.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  29. Anita says:

    Both the twins will now be a part of the army.
    But, are they on the same side or on opposite?
    Depends if grandma & grandpa’s home are in the same nation!

    Like

  30. neilmacdon says:

    A civil war is such a terrible thing. Its lines fracture hearts

    Like

  31. Tannille says:

    Chilling how quickly life can change. I am guessing no isn’t an option?

    Like

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