Ordinary – Friday Fictioneers

Due to a variety of circumstances, my input this week is somewhat abbreviated.
Thanks to Rochelle as always for hosting this challenge, and to Jan for the prompt photo, below.

© Jan Wayne Fields

Ordinary

I wonder what it’s like to be ordinary.
To be one of those bland people, one of the faceless crowd, someone who is never noticed.
There are those of us from whom a light shines, who brighten up other, less fortunate, lives.
And some who stumble along in the gloom, unremarked and unremarkable.
When life’s little catastrophes befall them we might smile faintly, or just shrug, uninterested.
They have no importance to our own, much more significant, lives.
Ha, but do you know the funny thing?
Some people are so ordinary that they just don’t see it.

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
This entry was posted in Sound Bite Fiction and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

49 Responses to Ordinary – Friday Fictioneers

  1. A good story though short, C.E. If someone seems significantly ordinary it’s probably because we don’t know much about them. We might be surprised if we knew more. For all we know, they could be living in the Government Witness Protection Program. If I was in that, I’d make an effort to seem ordinary also. Yes, we may seem the same to them. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Like

  2. This is sad, not just for the “ordinary people” but also for those that describe them.

    Like

  3. Lynn Love says:

    Horrible and yet a true observation. Some people do seem to shine, have others fluttering round them, while many just shuffle in the shadows. Wonderfully told and dark as pitch. Very you, C 🙂

    Like

  4. lisarey1990 says:

    Great character portrayal.

    Like

  5. Nan Falkner says:

    This guy is FULL OF HIMSELF! He’s the boring one and he doesn’t even know it! Nice story!

    Like

  6. Penny L Howe says:

    Ah. Most interesting.
    Hi, B.
    I’m guessing this represents the equation of Id vs Ego = Relativity. Throwing in a dash of individual perspective of course. Cool, we could have discourse for hours on this one! xxx

    Like

  7. Mike says:

    Give me the ordinary any day, much safer

    Like

  8. granonine says:

    What an interesting soliloquy. The speaker could easily be a sociopath, who truly believes he lives in a higher realm than lesser mortals. It’s a good character study, and a good read.

    Like

  9. 4963andypop says:

    This voice comes off to me as an intellectual snob, couching his prejudices in theory. The story tells us more about his own opinion of himself than of what he thinks he knows about “ordinary” people. Nice intro to a less than likable character.

    Like

  10. Rowena says:

    Very interesting and I love a reflective, philosophical piece of writing. You drew me right in and I hope for his sake he remains with his delusions and enjoys his self-importance while he can.
    I am an extroverted extrovert, although I’ve had to reign myself in thanks to marriage and kids. A new friend DJs for karaoke locally and I was like wow. I’ve been looking for a stage. I couldn’t wait. Then, some other friends of mine said they couldn’t stand it and you get these people hopping up who can’t sing. I did take the shine off things a bit. Haven’t got there yet but there are ways of making sure you’re far from ordinary and some of us don’t even have to try.
    That might not be a good thing either.
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

    Like

  11. Abhijit Ray says:

    Ordinary faceless people are good secret service men. Flamboyant people are like mafia dons, wearing a yellow shirt and a white trousers. One is ordinary and the other a showman, both do not see that they appear odd.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Sandra says:

    A very reflective piece this week, CE. The speaker’s orientation is ambiguous for me. I’m not sure whether he’s being derisive or envious.

    Like

  13. Every ordinary man thinks he’s unique… but there is a comfort in being ordinary as soon as you realize it.

    Like

  14. James McEwan says:

    There is too much excitement for ordinary folk, best just to sit quietly and be well ordinary.
    Loved it.

    Like

  15. draliman says:

    I feel the narrator has fallen into his own contemplative trap. Nice one!

    Like

  16. Ordinary people are the cogs in the wheel of life, without the ordinary folk the whole engine would seize, maybe!

    Like

  17. I think ordinary is the best way to be and the narrator has a little bit of a puffed-up view of himself. =) We all have a spark, but some work extra to make theirs shine.

    Like

  18. Aah, a philosophical note has been touched this time!

    Like

  19. msjadeli says:

    Compelling rumination here. In these days of extremes, ordinary is refreshing.

    Like

  20. When you don’t see your own reflection in a shop widow you are even less than ordinary – or you left your specs at home..

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Dear CE,

    Perhaps the narrator is so self-absorbed he can’t see beyond himself. Methinks the “ordinary” people are more interesting than he realizes and he needs a clearer mirror in which to see his reflection. Nicely rendered.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  22. Iain Kelly says:

    A piece of contemplative philosophy, I wonder if our narrator here may be lacking a bit of self-awareness too.

    Like

  23. neilmacdon says:

    I can sense a point of inflection coming, where the speaker’s voice shades over into the beginning of envy

    Like

Leave your Sound Bite here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.