Carvings – Friday Fictioneers

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by the wonderful Rochelle, the undisputed master of what I call Sound Bite Fiction.
She sets the weekly challenge, and the standard.
And the prompt, which this week is provided courtesy of
JS Brand. Also known as John!
The idea, as always, is to write a story of around 100 words based on this picture, below.

© JS Brand

Click here to hear the writer read his words:

Carvings

Professor Weisekopf studies the carvings carefully.
Look, he says excitedly, they tell a story!
The team is on the site of an ancient burial ground.
They tread warily, this place is worshipped by the indigenous people.
Anything that might be misconstrued could have dire consequences.
Professor, an assistant points, what is that symbol?
How curious, he replies, it looks like a musical notation.
There is a restless murmur from the watchers.
Professor, I’ve got it!
Heads turn towards Ava, the young, pretty assistant, who is the story’s romantic interest.
She laughs delightedly!
And sings.
Fish gotta swim, birds gotta fly…

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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59 Responses to Carvings – Friday Fictioneers

  1. Nice one, Brian. Ava has that joie de vivre, so many lack

    Like

  2. notestowomen says:

    Ava sure livened things up. Nice take on the prompt.

    Like

  3. Prior... says:

    like the singing at the end and enjoyed your audio track

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      Ah, you are more than kind. Most people say I have a face for radio and a voice for books.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        haha – that is funny.
        and what I also liked about the audio was the inflection that enriched it.
        for example,
        I read many lines different from the way you said it – liek this one:
        what is that symbol?
        you placed the emphasis on “that” whereas in my mind the word symbol had the main emphasis –

        Like

        • ceayr says:

          Thank you again, Yvette, if I may call you by your given name, you have got my week off to a great start.
          I often wonder if the readings are worthwhile.
          I am grateful that you were interested enough to pick up on the inflections, smart enough to understand the difference, and kind enough to take the time to share.
          Inflections in speech are obviously difficult to communicate unless we pepper our writing with italics and/or capitals, which can reduce the impact when we really need to emphasise something.
          Have a great week.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Prior... says:

            you are right – the extras in the writing would pull from it.
            and the other thing I noticed was that you slowed me down – as I read the nicely paced
            audio I realized that I speed read (so easy to do with flash fiction) and I just sat back and chill-axed – and so do not stop adding the audio track….(maybe give us the feature to speed it up tho – kidding kidding)
            and pleas feel free to use my name…
            🙂

            Like

  4. Indira says:

    Interesting story.

    Like

  5. Dale says:

    And he sings! Fun take, C.E… and I love when there is an “Ava” in a group of “too serious” ones…

    Like

  6. The introduction of Ava the romantic interest, made me guffaw! Brilliant thanks for making me laugh

    Like

  7. I was an archaeologist for ten years. Goodness. So much could be so boring! And hey! Anything that couldn’t be explained was chalked up to “religion.”

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  8. Archaeology, though interesting, can be sort of dry. Good for Ava, for attempting to bring a bit of joy.

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  9. Abhijit Ray says:

    Young student Ava gave a clever answer. Who knows what exactly the musical notes say.

    Like

  10. Clever ending, C.E.
    I can only assume the next line of the lyrics will tell us who has to die.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Nice story and an interesting song.

    Like

  12. 4963andypop says:

    What could be better than ancient indigenous folks, passing down a song through the ages? Or at least, the decades.

    Like

  13. I have a feeling that professor Weisekopf might get some grey hairs… maybe next time he will see the “made in China” label on the back of the sculpture.

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  14. Super story – I’ll be singing all day now!

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Like

  15. The world needs more such Avas to make a fun, livelier place. Good writing Ceayr.

    Like

  16. Iain Kelly says:

    Archaeology and a song. What’s not to love about Ava?

    Like

  17. Excellent – except I’m gonna have that song running through my mind for the rest of the day!

    Like

  18. Dear CE,

    Lovely girl…might not make it as an archaeologist ;). Fun take on the prompt. I enjoyed hearing you sing.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  19. neilmacdon says:

    but they don’t last long if they try (Tom Lehrer)

    Liked by 1 person

  20. jillyfunnell says:

    Of course, this made me think of Ava Gardner. Lovely writing.

    Like

  21. Sandra says:

    Can’t help lovin’ that Ava. She’ll go far. Maybe not far enough but…

    Like

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