Moving, again – Friday Fictioneers

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by the wonderful Rochelle, the undisputed master of what I call Sound Bite Fiction.
She sets the weekly challenge, and the standard.
This week’s prompt is provided by J Hardy Carroll, and made me think of moving house.
I sometimes try to remember how many homes I have had in my life.
The last time I counted I lost track around thirty, when I realised I had forgotten a whole country from many years ago.

The idea, as always, is to write a story of around 100 words based on this picture, below.

© J Hardy Carroll


Click here to hear the writer read his words:

Moving, again

I have been in this apartment almost four years.
And I am moving, again.
It is strange to put your life into boxes.
Some stuff is still boxe
d from last time.
Clothes lie untouched in a suitcase.
Will I need them again?
Only if I return to those northern climes that I now find intimidating.
I have rented for the past dozen years.
And had seven different homes.

I
own no TV, no furniture, no white goods.
No
material possessions.
Except for some pieces of art, gifts from friends and former lovers.
They are my memories.
Everything else is irrelevant.

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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68 Responses to Moving, again – Friday Fictioneers

  1. Nicely paced, and so much back story between the lines, The last two lines are powerful and the pathos of the piece makes me wonder if the narrator truly believes this, or if they are what he tells himself to justify the circumstances his travel-light renter lifestyle dictates

    Like

  2. you took your story outside the “box.” There’s a lonely tone in it and a tone of satisfaction. Nicely done.

    Like

  3. Possessions are just items but memories are treasures of the mind no one can take from you and you can take anywhere.
    Loved listening to you read your words, CE. As always, thoughtful inspirational writing.
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I totally get where he is coming from.
    So much less to dust also!
    A very relatable story.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I somehow feel a restlessness … somehow there has been no friend or lover that is anything more than a memory…

    Like

  6. rgayer55 says:

    Your narrator sounds like a hoarder to me. I keep all my stuff in a matchbox.

    Like

  7. Hmmmmmmmmm.
    Don’t know if she sounds fatalistically or not.
    Guess she has come to terms with her life!

    Like

  8. Norma says:

    Oh, your narrator is so much at peace with himself and his belongings or no belongings. Moving is a pain…boxing… unboxing but if there are no boxes that would be light and easy.I read this twice and then thrice with the audio on. Sometimes simple is the best.

    Like

  9. Jelli says:

    Having had to move so very many times in my married days, I do understand. Not looking forward to moving again in the coming months, but one must go where one must go… this move is something Hubby wants.

    Like

  10. James McEwan says:

    Lovely sentiments – seven homes eh! Got to keep looking.

    Like

  11. Great atmosphere, and tge narrator really seems to be at peace with his life choices, which is so rare.

    Like

  12. subroto says:

    A transferable job unless he is a nomad at heart. Good portrait of a man who probably finds comfort in moving on.

    Like

  13. k rawson says:

    Nice portrait of a man(?) attached only to his memories. Such a sadness to his tone…is he lonely? Why must he always keep moving? Intriguing character.

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      Yes, a man.
      Interesting that you read sadness in the words, not everyone does (see below).
      Not necessarily lonely, I suggest, but alone, perhaps because of his innate restlessness.

      Liked by 1 person

      • k rawson says:

        Alone because if his restlessness makes sense. It is interesting how differently people can interpret a piece. There are as many different interpretations as there are readers, I’ll bet.

        Like

        • ceayr says:

          Indeed.
          Envy (Neil), true freedom (Willow), sadness and acceptance (Gran), straight priorities (Lynn), untouched and rare (Moon).
          Sascha is miffed that no one died and Penny just enjoyed it!
          Not bad for 100 words.

          Like

  14. Have I become jaded?
    I read: no white goods…because they would show the blood, wouldn’t they?

    Like

  15. jillyfunnell says:

    The lightness of offloading pointless possessions is great but I know I would find myself wishing I’d kept the washing machine. Also if you haven’t opened a box for four years maybe you don’t need what’s inside it?

    Like

  16. Moon says:

    It is hard to find a man/ woman who is untouched by materialistic pursuits. He is rare, I must say.

    Like

  17. Alice Audrey says:

    Almost like living out of a suitcase.

    Like

  18. Dale says:

    As one who is preparing her house to move, though not often enough to not be able to count, it makes me think what do I really need to keep?

    Like

  19. Lynn Love says:

    Nice your narrarot has his priorities straight. A few personal momentoes and memories that’s really all we need in the end. Beautifully told with a deft touch. Lovely C

    Like

  20. granonine says:

    It’s like reading someone’s diary or personal journal. Such a sense of sadness, but at the same time this character seems to have accepted life as it come. Good one.

    Like

  21. pennygadd51 says:

    That’s a very interesting contribution. It has no plot; no description; no dialogue; almost no characters, for the narrator is self-effacing. And yet it’s fascinating. I’ve read it several times, for enjoyment as much as education. I suppose it may be the intimacy with which the narrator is sharing something of his life. Nice work, CE

    Like

  22. Sandra says:

    I can so identify with this, after 19 homes in 23 years and 5 countries. All except the television and white goods, that is. 🙂 This was crisp, terse and concise, but said such a lot. And no one died. Good one.

    Liked by 1 person

    • ceayr says:

      It is not often I laugh aloud at a comment, Sandra, but your parting shot got me there! The nomadic life is not for everyone, but it does provide so much material, doesn’t it!

      Like

  23. Iain Kelly says:

    It’s sounds idyllic, but there are some possessions that I would loathe to give up.

    Like

  24. willow88switches says:

    In the stripping down, one discovers true freedom in living without clutter and the ability to pick up and move. Gypsy lifestyle or the irony of minimalism – the bite of loneliness and emptiness?

    Perfectly, crisply penned.

    Like

  25. Dear C.E.

    Such a feeling to this one. Beautifully constructed with a perfect ending line.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  26. neilmacdon says:

    I envy your narrator

    Like

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