The Photo – Friday Fictioneers

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by the wonderful Rochelle, the undisputed master of what I call Sound Bite Fiction.
She sets the weekly challenge, the standard, and the prompt photo.
The idea, as always, is to write a story of around 100 words based on this picture, below, which this week is supplied by
Ted Strutz.

© Ted Strutz

Click here to hear the writer read his words:

 

 

The Photo

I knew I’d seen him before.
There he is.
In the background of that photo.
The one from the holiday she took with her friends all those years ago.
I noticed him at the time because of how he was gazing at her.
With an expression of what?
Adoration?
She laughed, of course, when I asked.
Perhaps a little too much.
Just a guy in the crowd, she said.
Never seen him before, she said.
And laughed again.
Perhaps a little too loudly.
But here he is again today.
At her funeral.
With tears in his eyes.

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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57 Responses to The Photo – Friday Fictioneers

  1. A great story, C.E. I had to almost bodily toss out a crazy woman who considered my husband was her “uncle” and this flat partly hers. I suspected he was flattered at the attention and so too easy with her. I was angry and threatened to call the police so she finally left. She tried on a couple of occasions other days to come in again but I kept the guard door shut. —- Suzanne

    Like

  2. Natasha says:

    Dear C.E.,

    What a finely told tale. The imageries are as vivid as can be.
    It’s as though the funeral and his final appearance was a death knell to all things wonderful that the couple shared through the years.

    Love how deftly you’ve told this tale. Privileged to have read it. 🙂

    Like

  3. Oh him…yea..I know this story, but for me it was ;;;”Oh her…”

    Like

  4. It’s sad to think he might be haunted with this nagging doubt and she can’t set it right. It certainly is true that no one knows are deepest parts. Your piece was engaging and thought-provoking, as they so often are.

    Like

  5. granonine says:

    CE, this is beautifully written. The repetition of “Perhaps a little too loudly/much” is very effective. The sadness is palpable. Well done.

    Like

  6. Partners don’t always share everything, and sometimes that is a good thing. But it does leave little mysteries that nag us. Perhaps she was faithful, and the stranger was the unfortunate bearer of unrequited love.

    Like

  7. James McEwan says:

    This raises an interesting question for me; how well do you know and trust someone?
    Perhaps an infatuation from a stranger or a forgotten school crush.

    Like

  8. pennygadd51 says:

    Am I too accustomed to blood from your pen, CE? I found myself wondering whether the narrator had played any part in her death…Nobbinmaug’s comment is very apt.
    Very well told, M’sieu!

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      Interesting comment, Penny.
      A quick review of my FF tales shows that there has been blood in only one story in the past 3 months.
      Glad you enjoyed it regardless

      Like

  9. Nobbinmaug says:

    The tell-tale laugh. This was well-crafted. It balances well between his potential paranoia and her potential infidelity.

    Like

  10. bearmkwa says:

    A simply beautiful poem this week. Loved it!

    Like

  11. Ah, the laugh! Well done. (P.S. I love “hearing” your stories, too.)

    Like

  12. draliman says:

    Pretty rough on him. Should he confront the stranger, or is it better not to know how deep it ran?

    Like

  13. Tannille says:

    Great flow. Truth seems to always resurface eventually.

    Like

  14. Dale says:

    Those laughs give it all away, don’t they?

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Mike says:

    A fine story,

    Like

  16. A big story in a tiny package. I like it.
    Tracey

    Like

  17. msjadeli says:

    That would make grief so much more complicated. I don’t envy that person. Well-told, C.E.

    Like

  18. Iain Kelly says:

    Should he confront him to learn the truth? Perhaps in hindsight they could become friends…

    Like

  19. We think we everything that’s going on, but too often we don’t. Beautifully written.

    Like

  20. Wow.
    Painful and gentle and well paced – we know where it goes from the start and yet we have to read through to ascertain to ourselves what we already know. Just like your character.
    Nicely done!
    Na’ama

    Like

  21. emmylgant says:

    Great pace in this tale, so much left unsaid. Suspicion to painful certainty in the reveal of a tear. Love it.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Dear C.E.

    Well layered story. Her too loud laughter makes me think she was hiding something.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  23. neilmacdon says:

    Her laugh is beautifully detailed

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Sandra says:

    This sounds very painful. And of course, the narrator has no way now of knowing whether the attraction was sufficiently mutual to have made a mockery of his own relationship. Nicely done.

    Like

  25. Lynn Love says:

    He should have listened to his instincts! He knew the chap was significant years earlier, but let it slide. I like your hints at her guilt, C – that too loud laugh. Great story as always

    Liked by 1 person

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