i luv u – Friday Fictioneers

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by the wonderful Rochelle, the undisputed master of what I call Sound Bite Fiction.
She sets the weekly challenge, and the standard.
This week’s photo is by
good ol’ Doug MacIlroy, who reappears like the proverbial bad penny.
Good to see you, Doug.

The idea, as always, is to write a story of around 100 words based on this picture, below.

© Douglas M. MacIlroy


Click here to hear the writer read his words:

i luv u

They can only communicate on-line now.
R’s husband is brutally jealous.
His fists fly at the slightest provocation.
Real or imaginary.
He scrutinises her email, examines all her social media accounts, checks every word that she publishes.
They become increasingly creative, trying to avoid the inevitable.
They know that if the lover’s identity is discovered there will be blood.
Maybe worse.
She stares at his latest photo.
The house has a For Sale sign.
It looks very familiar.
Mrs Robertson, her neighbour, is ecstatic.
We’ve just got the most amazing offer, she shrieks.
R trembles with anticipation.
And fear.

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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52 Responses to i luv u – Friday Fictioneers

  1. kislaya says:

    Hmm…violence, tension, mistrust, fear, anxiety and anticipation…your story has all the ingredients.

    Like

  2. Rowena says:

    The storm is brewing and very nicely crafted, CE. I personally can’t understand how anyone could have an intense affair and not get caught. I’d unwittingly leave clues all over the place and never get away with it. You need to be meticulously organized. Or, you partner doesn’t really mind and goes with the flow. Wants to get a bit more writing done for example…
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

    Like

  3. Great tension as we wonder what these foolish people will do next!

    Like

  4. Hmm, I was always told ‘not on your own doorstep,’ but over the garden fence? That’s a fence I’d like to sit on and watch the world go by.

    Like

  5. StuHN says:

    Very film noirish.

    Like

  6. Indira says:

    Now that’s a very stubborn wife, taking all the risk for the thrill. Can’t she leave her cruelly jelous husband? Someone going to be murdered soon. Very interestingly written, but you always do.

    Like

  7. jillyfunnell says:

    I would not want the lover living next door. If she is okay with reality then crack on but she may well discover he was better in a letter. Great take. I love the weaving of the web.

    Like

  8. Priya says:

    Not a wise move, the lover moving in next door. I doubt there is not going to be a happy ending.
    Is there going to be a sequel?

    Like

  9. plaridel says:

    it’s like defense mechanism to me on the part of the husband who might be having an affair himself. anyway, the thrill of taking the risk and getting away with it can be rewarding.

    Like

  10. lisarey1990 says:

    This is very intriguing. There’s clearly so much more to this story. There’s great commentary on the internet & how it can bring out all the insecurities in relationships too. A great write.

    Like

  11. Mmm, next door neighbors. The intrigue is just getting started.

    Like

  12. 4963andypop says:

    Definitely not a risk-averse set of lovers. It could be a comedy if Mrs Robertson turned out to be having an affair with R’s husband!Although he might find it difficult to follow both of them on social media. 😊

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      Fortunately, while there is clearly some element of risk, my little tale is set in Scotland, where access to semi-automatic weaponry is more limited than over in the Land of the Freely-Available. To add to your Brian Rix-like scenarion, Mrs Robertson’s husband could have a fling with R’s lover’s wife. Although I hear she is not the pleasantest of ladies.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I like the open-endedness of this one. The real question is who’s blood (or worse–I haven’t quite figured that one out yet) will be spilled. You left me on the edge of my seat. Hot Damn!

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      From what I hear, Russell, the edge of your seat is a bit like Wyoming, a pretty vast area. Perhaps nothing more than morning tea (I do hope it is not Earl Grey) will be spilled.

      Like

  14. Violet Lentz says:

    Well they say fences make the best neighbors… I wonder what ‘they’ would say about this little arrangement…. Nicely done.

    Like

  15. My husband’s oldest brother does this to his wife. If she and I want to talk about anything personal it’s practically impossible. (Thank goodness she’s not having an affair!) Well done.

    Like

  16. Sandra says:

    If she thought things were difficult before, she’s entering into a whole new ballgame right now. Nicely done, CE. As ever. I know there’s no corpse involved, but I’m confident that’s all just a matter of timing.

    Like

  17. Abhijit Ray says:

    Is it her lover who is buying Mrs. Robertson’s house? Is she leaving her husband? They are indeed becoming creative.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Ooooh, her lover likes living on the edge, doesn’t he?

    Like

  19. I think in cases like this it could be wise to force a confrontation… sooner or later even heavy fists will hit concrete.

    Like

  20. Moving in next door could be brilliant or rather stupid. I guess only time will tell. An intriguing story as always!

    Like

  21. granonine says:

    That doesn’t seem like a wise move to me.

    Like

  22. pennygadd51 says:

    I can imagine several outcomes, none of them good…oh dear…

    Like

  23. Kalpana Solsi says:

    He scrutinises her email, examines all her social media accounts, checks every word that she publishes…..Ohh my God. she has to be very careful and creative too.

    Like

  24. trentpmcd says:

    “Our new neighbor seems awfully friendly. He’s always over here borrowing something or just chatting. You notice that?” “We have a new neighbor? Oh, I guess I didn’t notice…” Might be a little sticky making it work. Unless there is a freak accident involving R’s husband.

    Like

  25. Moving in next door doesn’t seem very bright. ..although perhaps it’s genius because it would be unexpected.

    Like

  26. wildchild47 says:

    walking a fine line – touch and blow? ouch.

    Like

  27. It’s like a scene from a soap opera! i luv it!

    Like

  28. Dear CE,

    Sounds like trouble looms on the horizon. Incidentally, Doug hasn’t resurfaced. I’m just revisiting an old photo of his.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Iain Kelly says:

    Moving in next door – this can only end in trouble!

    Like

  30. neilmacdon says:

    There are some lines you don’t cross, not if you want to stay alive. Nicely crafted.

    Like

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