The Naiad – Friday Fictioneers

Friday Fictioneers is hosted by the wonderful Rochelle, the undisputed master of what I call Sound Bite Fiction.
She sets the weekly challenge, and the standard.
This week’s photo, by Dale Rogerson, provoked an immediate need to visit the bathroom.
Too much information, perhaps?
The idea, as always, is to write a story of around 100 words based on this picture, below.

© Dale Rogerson

Click here to hear the writer read his words:

The Naiad

Water is the source of all things good, she says.
Every creature on earth, every plant, requires water to live.
Without it there is no beauty, only desolation.
You’re a Mermaid, I ask, sceptically.
A Naiad, she replies, a Mermaid, by definition, lives in the sea.
I am a guardian of fresh water, this is my domain.
Her elegant arm indicates the stream and the lake from which it flows.
I catch and bind her hands.
I have need of you, I say, Nature can take care of itself.
I will die in captivity, she says.
I shrug.
Then I’ll find another.

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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48 Responses to The Naiad – Friday Fictioneers

  1. This little story capture what’s bad in humanity… excellent writing that made me lose another little bit of hope for us a specie

    Like

  2. 4963andypop says:

    You and neil have hit upon the same theme. Powerful allegory.

    Like

  3. Selfish and brutal exploitation, great allegory for the way we treat the planet.

    Like

  4. The naiad met the wrong person, someone greedy and callous to the world’s need for her. Sounds all too familiar for real life. Well written metaphor.

    Like

  5. michael1148humphris says:

    This is one grim tale of the destructive nature of some

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  6. granonine says:

    Cold-hearted bloke, isn’t he?

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  7. Brutal, as indeed are some of mankind.

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  8. A practical sort of chap, our hero.

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  9. Wicked, wicked man. Nicely written.

    Like

  10. jwdwrites says:

    I was unable to ‘like’ this story for some unknown reason, but I thought I would let you know anyway that I liked it. 🙂

    Like

  11. Let me start by saying that if I had not written my story before reading yours, I would probably start wondering if my muse didn’t plagiarized yours by accident.

    I love this eerie piece, and the terrible reality dancing in its theme. The narrator is a despicable creature, the way he treats another living being makes my skin crawl… and my feet want to kick him in the teeth.

    I hope the Naiad can turn his words against him, that she can show him that Nature (and her creatures) can, indeed, take care of their own (and self).

    Like

    • ceayr says:

      I sympathise with your views, Magaly, they are exactly in accord with my own.
      I hope you are right, but I suspect that we will continue to destroy our planet’s natural resources until it is too late.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Naiads aren’t salty enough for me, I like a bit of salt..

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  13. Dale says:

    Well told tale, Mr. ayr. Man’s callous waste of natural resources…

    Like

  14. Sandra says:

    Yeah, he’s a romantic for sure. Consumerism gone mad.

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  15. Indira says:

    Till one has a choice to go for another, then what? Beautifully written. The way we are misusing water, horrifying, indeed.

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  16. Wow! always knew you, i mean your writings can be so deliciously wicked, Ceayr.

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  17. k rawson says:

    What happens when there are no more others? I fear we will find out.

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  18. Dear CE,

    Such a statement of how humans have raped the natural resources. What happens when we can’t ‘find another?’ Well done, sir.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle.

    Like

  19. jillyfunnell says:

    Bad luck for the naiad that she met a psychopath.

    Like

  20. This reads like a metaphor for the world we live in. Sadly and nicely done.

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Like

  21. Iain Kelly says:

    Naiads have a pretty tough time of it – overshadowed and mistaken for mermaids, then bound up and stolen away. Hopefully some sort of magical curse awaits him for his deeds.

    Like

  22. neilmacdon says:

    The brutal callousness of unthinking exploitation well-captured, mate

    Like

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