The Butcher – Sunday Photo Fiction

Sunday Photo Fiction is a weekly challenge presented by my old friend Al Forbes.
The idea is to write a short story (200 word max) inspired by what you see in his picture (below).
I prefer not to comment on Al’s photo this week.
I am not a big fan of what it represents.
This is no reflection on my friend.
Click on this link to enter your tale, and see what others have written.

Copyright Al Forbes

Copyright Al Forbes

Clich here to hear me read the story:
The Butcher

His voice is quiet, thoughtful.
I feel he is not really speaking to me, just voicing his thoughts aloud.
Please don’t misunderstand, he says, I don’t hate all Catholics.
It seems it is the church itself, the organisation, that provokes his anger.
This is what causes him to do the dreadful deeds he is telling me about.
He is the man who has recently murdered, no, butchered, those two priests in Cremona and that one in Nice.
I have no reason to doubt his words.
I know details of these atrocities that have not been released to the general public.
So I believe him.
And I am afraid.
I am very afraid.
Because of the first words he spoke to me.
Forgive me, Father, for I have sinned.

About ceayr

A Scot who has discovered Paradise in a small town he calls Medville on the Côte d'Azur, C.E. Ayr has spent a large part of his life in the West of Scotland and a large part elsewhere. His first job was selling programmes at his local football club and he has since tried 73 other career paths, the longest being in IT, with varying degrees of success. He is somewhat nomadic, fairly irresponsible and, according to his darling daughter, a bit random.
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30 Responses to The Butcher – Sunday Photo Fiction

  1. Ooooooh that was unexpected and very well delivered🙂


  2. Sandra says:

    My current internet connection is excruciatingly slow, so I don’t often listen to your stories. Today I did. And your story now seems more horrifying than it did when I read it. Good one, CE. Frighteningly good.


  3. Sonny Price says:

    Well, that was hair-raising.🙂 Well done!


  4. Blindsided by the ending. Fantastic!


  5. Good writing, C.E. That was a great twist at the end. It reminds me a bit of the movie “The Rosary Murders”. A serial killer who’s killing priests and nuns in a U.S. city goes to confession and the priest can’t tell because of the seal of the confessional. The priest is scared the man will kill him after the confession. The killer leaves a rosary at the scene of each killing. —- Suzanne


  6. luckyjc007 says:

    Priests hear a lot and this had to be unnerving to hear. I doubt the prists’s first thought in these type of confessions…is forgiveness, especially if they happen to have known the person involved.


  7. mandibelle16 says:

    Poor priests. Chose the wrong religion I guess for England. I funny thing for a killer to kill because, but in history it didn’t happen a lot by Chrisrians and Protestants etc… Great write CE. Chilling ending.


    • ceayr says:

      Thank you, Amanda, for your usual enthusiasm.
      But how on earth did ‘England’ creep into your thoughts?
      You are absolutely right, of course, that about 99% of history’s butchery is in the name of religion.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mandibelle16 says:

        Hmm… I was thinking how the church changed to Anglicanism in England with Henry the 8th. Catholics were widely persecuted by many Queens/Kings. It just made sense for some reason, this guy was killing Catholics, had a problem with their religious views, even in a modern world. Not to mention, I wondered with some of the priests being child molesters, I thought the killer might be getting his revenge.


  8. julespaige says:

    Oh! Well then I think the back stories to our fiction pieces may have come from similar places…
    I’ve just finished reading ‘A treasury of Royal Scandals’ by Michael Farquhar.
    About royals and popes who were perhaps not so innocent.

    At one point one king, I forget which, 7 out of 8 of his great grandparents were related. Adding in the passing of instability and ‘madness’. The book starts from 1066 before the common era. But also recognizes the ‘Caesars’ as being, well not so nice leaders.

    (I’m need to attend to my grandee…I’ll be back for a ‘listen’.)


    • ceayr says:

      There is nothing ‘royal’ about my story, Jules, I do not promote these people in any way, ever.
      But always a joy to have you visit, I hope the reading does not cause your ears to fall off!

      Liked by 1 person

      • julespaige says:

        I enjoy voices. When younger and even now when singing lullabies to my Littles…I try different tones.

        Perhaps nothing ‘royal’ but it reminded me of the book I had read. How out of one breath there would be so much um…sanctimonious promises that were never really kept by those who proffered gilded words. And secrets…so many secrets.


  9. Really enjoyed reading this, great punch at the end… Although I think a scarier thing to have heard would have been forgive me father, for I am about to sin…


  10. Graham Lawrence says:

    I agree with Rochelle. An excellent story chillingly told.


  11. Excellent. Evocative and chilling.


  12. Steve Lakey says:

    As always, a pleasure to read.


  13. Very chilling with a lot of fear at the end there. Good story.


  14. Dear CE,

    A chill just blew through me. Well structured with a punch at the end. Easily one of your best.



    Liked by 2 people

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